A Study found Indoor air pollution 20 times the limit set by WHO

The study also reported that the level of PM 2.5 (particles less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter) was significantly higher than the levels reported by the nearest external government monitors.

New Delhi: Indoor air pollution levels in Delhi’s homes are 20 times higher than World Health Organization (WHO) standards, revealed a study by the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC India).

The study also reported that the level of PM 2.5 (particles less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter) was significantly higher than the levels reported by the nearest external government monitors.

The study, released Wednesday, also showed that high-income households were 13 times more likely to have an air purifier than low-income households, but its effect on indoor air pollution was only around 10%.

The study further reported an 8.6% drop in indoor PM2.5 levels in homes with pollution monitors (usually with air purifiers) and noted that such residents needed “affordable protective practices and slight changes in ventilation behaviour”. There was a possibility.
“In Delhi, the main thing is that no one, rich or poor, is able to breathe clean air,” said study lead author Kenneth Lee.

“It’s a complicated vicious cycle. When you’re not aware of the level of pollution inside your homes, you don’t worry about it, and so you’re less likely to take corrective action. Air demand may pick up.

The study surveyed thousands of Delhi households of different socioeconomic strata between 2018 and 2020 and found that indoor PM2.5 levels rise in the morning and evening when households are most likely to cook .

Experts said there is a growing awareness among people about the harmful effects of outdoor pollution, but people are still unaware of how the air inside their homes, offices and schools can also become highly polluted.

“We need to create awareness among people. While there are a lot of studies about outdoor pollution and how serious it can be for your health, there is an assessment of indoor pollution levels and how they can affect people. More study is needed to do this.

At least you can prepare yourself with a mask outside, but inside your homes, you let your guard down,” said Anumita Roychowdhury, executive director (research and advocacy), Center for Science and Environment.

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