G7 countries agree to limit global temperature to 1.5 ° C

Bernice Lee, Research Director, Futures; The founding director, Hoffman Center for Sustainable Resource Economy, said, “This G7 announcement leaves China alone as the sole funder of foreign coal power plants. Beijing has already indicated that it is abandoning coal funding in Bangladesh, And I think this will raise further questions on its export finance strategy. Is China really the last rung for an industry? “

Senior power analyst at Amber, a London-based global energy think tank
According to Dave Jones, “Most G7 countries have already pledged for 2030, and plans have been made for it when it debuted, so the chances of reaching this conclusion are very high: coal power power plants The first necessary step is to phase out the phased manner, and gas power also needs to be phased out shortly thereafter to decarbonize the entire power sector by 2035. “

Further, Georgina Shendler, Senior International Policy Officer, Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (UK NGO), lauded the results of this meeting, stating, “We need this ambition from the G7 before two important negotiations globally for nature and climate A strong signal of was needed. The G7 has an important opportunity to do two things (as a minimum) to take positive action on nature and the climate: the emphasis on the global goal of compensating for nature’s harm by 2030 Giving and introducing policies and laws to prevent deforestation and reduce footprint in globally traded goods.

England has recently agreed to aim for 2030 for legislation to curb wildlife degradation – this could be an unprecedented start, and should encourage other countries to keep similar commitments in the law . Saving 30% of our land and sea is a very good means to secure the restoration of nature, but it is only a means, not a complete solution, and the increasing loss of biodiversity will not change by itself. In order to realize the Global Agreement on Nature this year, we will have to provide funds and other financial instruments to help poorer countries get out of Kovid and environmental harm. “

Finally, Ruth Valerio, Director of Advocacy and Influencing at Tearfund, stated, “G7 nations are among the most polluting countries in the world and their energy decisions are already causing a lot of problems in the communities where Tearfund works There is a dire need for a commitment to end coal use slowly, if we want to keep global heating below 1.5 ℃, then G7 countries now need to stop supporting all fossil fuels and climate on those The impact of the change should be minimal, which has less affected the environment. ”

While agreeing on a very ambitious target against their previous goal of limiting global temperature to two degrees Celsius, the environment ministers of the G7 countries have agreed to limit the increase in global temperature to 1.5 ° C in line with their climate.

Will set goals These ministers have also agreed to stop direct funding of coal-fired power stations in poor countries by the end of 2021. This decision will also send a clear message to banks investing in coal power in poor countries.

The decision also has a significant commitment to protecting 30% of land for nature by 2030 to help promote wildlife and absorb carbon emissions. Environmental ministers from the UK, US, Canada, Japan, France, Italy and Germany participated virtually in this G7 meeting and this meeting has created a role for these leaders’ meeting to be held in Cornwall in June.

The UK meeting was led by the UK, and a government source told BBC News that “we are very excited by the results”.

The decisions taken at this meeting will be an important milestone in the direction of the important global climate summit, called COP26, to be held in Glasgow in November.

The minister appears to have been heavily influenced by a recent report by the rich countries’ energy think tank, the IEA.

The IEA study states that if the world wants to reach net-zero emissions by the middle of the century, there can be no new coal, oil or gas development from now on. The G7 ministers agreed that fast-growing economies such as India and Indonesia needed a lot of cash to help them achieve clean technology. This decision will be carried forward to the G7 Finance Ministers meeting on 4 June.

The release issued by the ministers at the end of this meeting stated: “We will end new direct government support for carbon-intensive international fossil fuel energy.” This is directly related to coal and oil and is consistent with the findings of the IEA study.

The effect or outcome of the decision of this Group of Ministers will be that Japan, which was recognized as a major global coal investor, will no longer invest in coal and only China is different as the last major proponent of coal in the world. – The thread will appear.

If you take a look at the decisions taken in this meeting, then they are as follows-

-Government policies will be based on 1.5C and will be commissioned to motivate other major economies for this.

  • ‘Committed to deep reduction in emissions in the 2020s, committing distance from coal use in the 2030s and decarbonizing their power projects.
    International government support for thermal coal power generation should be discontinued by the end of -2021.
  • Prohibit new international government support for fossil fuels to keep temperatures within 1.5C.
    -Base public finance with a target of 1.5C of the Paris Agreement in 2020 and ask all multilateral development banks (ie World Bank) to “join this effort”.
  • Provide new climate finance support to developing countries even before COP 26.
  • Agree on the global goal for a return to nature by 2030 and introduce policies and legislation to reduce deforestation in globally traded commodities.

If this meeting is analyzed, it is clear that currently the use of coal is particularly high, and if this use is stopped, then it means that Korea and Japan will give up support for foreign coal import. Only China will be isolated as the last major funder of foreign coal in Southeast Asia. The press release issued after the meeting clearly stated that “continued international investment in coal should now cease and new direct government support for unabated international thermal coal power generation by the end of 2021 should cease altogether and this direction I have to be committed to take concrete steps. “

In his response, Jennifer Tolman, Senior Policy Advisor, E3G stated, “This meeting will serve as an engine to keep 1.5 degrees within reach and lay the foundation for a change. Green Revolution Facing the Health and Debt Crisis” The support of non-G7 countries that support US will not only significantly increase this proposal, but also phase-out public finances for coal and all international fossil fuel investments as the June G7 summit proves to be a clear test Will happen.”

Further, Luca Bergamaschi, co-founder, ECCO (Rome-based think tank) stated, “The result of the meeting is that these changes are being reset and relaunched due to the cooperation of major Western superpowers for climate and nature. It A positive impact towards COP 26. could be beginning. The G7 climate ministers are listening, now all G20 countries need to do the same. This is an important step ahead of the next G7 finance and leaders’ meetings. “

Bernice Lee, Research Director, Futures; The founding director, Hoffman Center for Sustainable Resource Economy, said, “This G7 announcement leaves China alone as the sole funder of foreign coal power plants. Beijing has already indicated that it is abandoning coal funding in Bangladesh, And I think this will raise further questions on its export finance strategy. Is China really the last rung for an industry? “

Senior power analyst at Amber, a London-based global energy think tank
According to Dave Jones, “Most G7 countries have already pledged for 2030, and plans have been made for it when it debuted, so the chances of reaching this conclusion are very high: coal power power plants The first necessary step is to phase out the phased manner, and gas power also needs to be phased out shortly thereafter to decarbonize the entire power sector by 2035. “

Further, Georgina Shendler, Senior International Policy Officer, Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (UK NGO), lauded the results of this meeting, stating, “We need this ambition from the G7 before two important negotiations globally for nature and climate A strong signal of was needed. The G7 has an important opportunity to do two things (as a minimum) to take positive action on nature and the climate: the emphasis on the global goal of compensating for nature’s harm by 2030 Giving and introducing policies and laws to prevent deforestation and reduce footprint in globally traded goods.

England has recently agreed to aim for 2030 for legislation to curb wildlife degradation – this could be an unprecedented start, and should encourage other countries to keep similar commitments in the law . Saving 30% of our land and sea is a very good means to secure the restoration of nature, but it is only a means, not a complete solution, and the increasing loss of biodiversity will not change by itself. In order to realize the Global Agreement on Nature this year, we will have to provide funds and other financial instruments to help poorer countries get out of Kovid and environmental harm. “

Finally, Ruth Valerio, Director of Advocacy and Influencing at Tearfund, stated, “G7 nations are among the most polluting countries in the world and their energy decisions are already causing a lot of problems in the communities where Tearfund works There is a dire need for a commitment to end coal use slowly, if we want to keep global heating below 1.5 ℃, then G7 countries now need to stop supporting all fossil fuels and climate on those The impact of the change should be minimal, which has less affected the environment. ”

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