Indian Kollam art of starting off the Biden-Harris US Presidential Opening Ceremony

More than 1,800 individuals from across America and many from India participated in the online initiative to create thousands of Kollam designs to celebrate the historic event.

Students from ten public schools in Washington DC participated in making Kollam art. Lambert said the District of Columbia Public School Arts curriculum focuses on equity and believes cultural representation is an important part of that effort.

Kollam, a traditional Indian art form of drawing geometric patterns on the floor as a token of welcome, was part of the inaugural virtual kick-off ceremony of President-elect Joe Biden and his deputy Kamala Harris, which traces their origins Tamil Tamil Nadu where these auspicious designs are preferred in almost every household.

More than 1,800 individuals from across America and many from India participated in the online initiative to create thousands of Kollam designs to celebrate the historic event.

“Many believe that Kollam signifies positive energy and new beginnings. People of all ages from different communities collaborated to make tiles from their homes with environmentally friendly materials. Beyond our expectations as a local project Started,” said Shanti Chandrasekhar, an award-winning multimedia and multidisciplinary artist from Maryland who along with many others took the initiative.

The initial idea was to have these Kollam patterns from across the country in front of the White House as a symbol of a good start for the new administration. Washington DC police later allowed the organizers to keep it near the opening site near Capitol Hill.

However, the permission was revoked due to unprecedented security measures implemented in Washington DC.

As a result, pictures of thousands of Kollam tiles were woven into a video on Saturday to welcome Biden and Harris to showcase the ‘Presidency for All’ spirit and America’s multi-cultural heritage.

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